Location: Italy

Fish seller

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Man selling fish out of the back of his truck in Bari.

Bike rack

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Clothes rack

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Simple alternative to an electric clothes dryer, this simple clothes dryer is beautifully integrated into the architectural ironwork. The curved up side arms also facilitate removal of the clothes further from the user.

Anonymous branding

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Two old logos on utility meters door. The playful use of the brackets in the logo produce a simple and engaging piece of communication.

Birth

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In Italy pink rosettes are placed on the front door of a house to mark a birth. Similarly a black one is used to mark a death. People have always wanted to communicate news to other, in effect giving a ‘status update’. What other ways can we show our status to others in a physical manner?

Preparing dinner

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A woman prepares Gnocchi in her doorway in Bari. By preparing the food in this location she feels connected to the outside world. ‘Available’ to chat.

Football decorations

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Football decorations in the streets of Bari. Like many European and South American countries, football plays an important role in society and culture. With red and white as colours of the local team, the residents in Bari use all materials at their disposal to support their team. Fortunately cheap daily objects such as disposable plates and cup match the team colours.

Political poster

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Would you trust this man? A political poster in Bari.

Air vent

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A ventilation grate becomes interestingly integrated with the wall behind it after years of painting.

Domestic shrines

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Shrines in Bari Centro Storico. Like football, religion plays an equally important part in life to residents in Bari. It is common for each household to have their own shrine outside the house. Resident ensure their shrines are well manicured, and each has a unique design.

Street life

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People watching people. In Bari where the streets are narrow and weather is warm most of the year, the streets are more inhabitant than most people’s living rooms. These shared communal spaces form an familiar environment for chat, debate, love, sadness and entertainment.

Football picth

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Goalposts painted on to the wall in Bari’s Centro Storico. With a pitch which is only marginally than posts themselves, these goalposts still fulfill their user’s needs.

Rubbish bins

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Communal rubbish bins in Bari, covered with a fake stone wall print. An attempt by local authorities to visually integrate these modern bins into an ancient context.

Entry phone

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Despite the modern technology inside, this video entry camera is disguised to fit into the local context of the old city walls.

Street life

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The pavements become an extension of the living room in many parts of Bari’s Centro Storico.

Micro urban transport

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A Wasp or ‘Ape’ as they are called in Italy parked in the narrow streets of Bari. These small low horsepower trucks made by Piaggio are a common site in Italy, where the town centers are still largely residential and are often labyrinths of narrow streets.

Postbox

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Confession box

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The confession boxes in St Nicola Cathedral, or San Nico as the Barese call it. This confession box was one of 14 in the cathedral. A red status light indicates when the box is in use.

Designer car

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A parked Fiat 900. Design in the 19XX by Bertone, the importance of indicating the creator of daily objects, such as a car, demonstrates the value Italians attribute to this piece of information.

Madonna shop

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In Southern Italy, shops dedicated to selling Catholic artifacts are frequently found alongside cafes, newsagents and tobacconists.